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explode-path
file-name-from-path
filename-extension
find-relative-path
normalize-path
path-only
simple-form-path
some-system-path->string
string->some-system-path
Version: 4.2.1
14.1.2 More Path Utilities

The bindings documented in this section are provided by the scheme/path and scheme libraries, but not scheme/base.

(explode-path path)
  (listof (or/c path-for-some-system? 'up 'same))
  path : (or/c path-string? path-for-some-system?)
Returns the list of path element that constitute path. If path is simplified in the sense of simple-form-path, then the result is always a list of paths, and the first element of the list is a root.

Returns the last element of path. If path syntactically a directory path (see split-path), then then result is #f.

Returns a byte string that is the extension part of the filename in path without the . separator. If path is syntactically a directory (see split-path) or if the path has no extension, #f is returned.

Finds a relative pathname with respect to basepath that names the same file or directory as path. Both basepath and path must be simplified in the sense of simple-form-path. If path is not a proper subpath of basepath (i.e., a subpath that is strictly longer), path is returned.

(normalize-path path [wrt])  path?
  path : path-string?
  wrt : (and/c path-string? complete-path?)
   = (current-directory)
Returns a normalized, complete version of path, expanding the path and resolving all soft links. If path is relative, then wrt is used as the base path.

Letter case is not normalized by normalize-path. For this and other reasons, such as whether the path is syntactically a directory, the result of normalize-path is not suitable for comparisons that determine whether two paths refer to the same file or directory (i.e., the comparison may produce false negatives).

An error is signaled by normalize-path if the input path contains an embedded path for a non-existent directory, or if an infinite cycle of soft links is detected.

If path is a filename, the file’s path is returned. If path is syntactically a directory, path is returned (as a path, if it was a string).

(simple-form-path path)  path?
  path : path-string?
Returns (simplify-path (path->complete-path path)), which ensures that the result is a complete path containing no up- or same-directory indicators.

Converts path to a string using a UTF-8 encoding of the path’s bytes.

Use this function when working with paths for a different system (whose encoding of pathnames might be unrelated to the current locale’s encoding) and when starting and ending with strings.

(string->some-system-path str kind)  path-for-some-system?
  str : string?
  kind : (or/c 'unix 'windows)
Converts str to a kind path using a UTF-8 encoding of the path’s bytes.

Use this function when working with paths for a different system (whose encoding of pathnames might be unrelated to the current locale’s encoding) and when starting and ending with strings.